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ELLS-IAGLR-2018 : \'Big Lakes, Small World\'. Exchange ideas and information on all aspects of large-lake limnology to highlight the diversity and commonalities across the world\'s great lakes.

IAGLR 2017 : A session about 'Big Lakes - Small World: Not all Great Lakes are Laurentian'

14 February 2017

Chaired by George Bullerjahn, Robert McKay, Boglarka Somogyi, John Lenters, Orlane Anneville, Lars Rudstam and Anne-Mari Ventelä

Physical Processes and Limnology:  Sessions 49-55

#49. Big Lakes - Small World: Not all Great Lakes are Laurentian

Chaired by George Bullerjahn, Robert McKay, Boglarka Somogyi, John Lenters, Orlane Anneville, Lars Rudstam and Anne-Mari Ventelä

Large lakes provide important ecosystem goods and services to our global society and are often characterized by pronounced physical, chemical, and trophic gradients. This is certainly true of the Laurentian Great Lakes, which are typically the focus of the IAGLR conference, but large lakes on other continents collectively span even broader gradients. These range from tropical lakes (e.g. Africa) to Arctic/subarctic lakes (e.g. Ladoga, Onego, Great Slave, Baikal), and temperate lakes (e.g. Balaton, Biwa, Geneva, Winnipeg). Despite the significant diversity among the world's great lakes, these important ecosystems are impacted by many common stressors such as climate change, eutrophication, invasive species, and land use changes. Alterations in lake function due to direct and indirect anthropogenic influences differ for each lake, yet often result in uncertain future threats to water quality and endemic species. Motivated by discussions at the 2015 European Large Lakes Symposium (ELLS), this session is devoted to gearing up for the first joint ELLS / IAGLR 2018 conference in France (Lake Geneva). Submissions are welcome from all aspects of global, large-lake limnology, particularly those that highlight the diversity and commonalities of the world's great lakes, their health and future trajectories, and presentations that stimulate ideas for future research priorities and special session topics for the 2018 joint conference.

George Bullerjahn, Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State Univerity, Bowling Green, OH 43403; (419) 372-8527; bullerj@bgsu.edu

Robert McKay, Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State Univerity, Bowling Green, OH 43403; (419) 372-6873; rmmckay@bgsu.edu

Boglarka Somogyi, Balaton Limnological Institute, Tihany, Hungary; (419) 372-8527; somogyi.boglarka@okologia.mta.hu

John Lenters, University of Wisconsin, Boulder Junction, WI 54512; (517) 294-5257; jlenters@wisc.edu

Orlane Anneville, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Thonon-les-Bains, 12345 France; (123) 456-7890; orlane.anneville@inra.fr

Lars Rudstam, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853; (607) 255-1555; rudstam@cornell.edu

Anne-Mari Ventelä, Pyhäjärvi Institute, Kauttua, Finland; (123) 456-7890; anne-mari.ventela@pji.fi

Site : #49. Big Lakes - Small World: Not all Great Lakes are Laurentian